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Most Recent Whisky Review

Dalmore 1981 Amorosa Finesse

Another rarer than “rocking horse shit” Dalmore expression we tried at a recent (well recent at time of writing) event at Reserve 101. Bottled at 46% ABV this bottle was described as “one of the last in the world”. If you can think of a better endorsement of Reserve101 as a whisky bar than they have access to juice like this I would love to hear it. #houstonsbestbar. I have to admit that my palate was pretty much shot by this stage of night (the event was “pour your own samples” format) so apologies in advance for brief notes. The nose was sweet with citrus peel. The taste was classic Dalmore with sweet marshmallow, creamy coffee and cigar smoke influence in the dry finish. Note book said… “great. just great”.

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  • Wednesday, 23 July 2014 21:21

    Blog Reader:  Are you going to post any new interesting blog entries, or for that matter, any kind of blog entries, ever again?

    Blog Writer: Yes.  When I have something to say that isn't tired and hacky.   I will in the meantime continue to post tasting notes and visit distilleries.

    Blog Reader:  Thank you.

    Blog Writer: No, thank you.

     

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